It’s funny, I’m sitting in a airport lounge in Denver awaiting my connecting flight to “fabulous” Las Vegas, but I’m not thinking about the lights and glitz just yet. Instead, I still have Tuesday’s 79th All-Star game jogging through my head.

It’s funny, I’m sitting in a airport lounge in Denver awaiting my connecting flight to “fabulous” Las Vegas, but I’m not thinking about the lights and glitz just yet.


Instead, I still have Tuesday’s 79th All-Star game jogging through my head.


Now, be honest, who stayed up until 1 a.m. to watch the conclusion of perhaps the greatest All-Star game ever played?


Liars.


It was quite remarkable to say the least. And how fitting it was to have Yankee Stadium – The House that Ruth Built, which is hosting its last Midsummer Classic – go out in such a grand style.


"It seemed like the stadium didn't want it to end. That's what we were talking about. It just wanted baseball to continue. I thought it was fitting,” said New York Yankees shortstop Derek Jeter after the game.


To see 40 of the game’s old warriors line up at their respected positions with this year’s starters before the game began was outstanding.


Watching the game unfold, you knew something was on the verge of happening. With the American League trailing, 2-0, an unlikely hero, J.D. Drew, hit a two-run shot to tie the game. When Drew came to the plate for his first All-Star at-bat, he was besieged by the booing of loyal Yankee fans. The booing, however, came to an abrupt end when he hit his game-tying smash.


Drew’s performance earned plaudits from those in attendance, MVP honors and, yes, a brand new vehicle. Of course, a baseball player winning an automobile for his effort is nothing new. Heck, Ty Cobb won several cars for winning the American League batting title.


Drew, who was groomed in the St. Louis Cardinals’ farm system, won over the fans of Boston toward the end of last season, and he, for a moment, even won over the fans of New York. Perhaps that’s an MVP accomplishment all by itself.


Everything aside, it was an outstanding game in an outstanding ballpark -- one of the game’s best throughout the years.


As Yankee Stadium prepares to close its doors on a long and fruitful history, this year’s installment of baseball’s All-Star game was just another great contest in a baseball cathedral.


Of course, had the game gone any longer I imagine commissioner Bud Selig wouldn’t have had that big smile on his face. But it still counted right?


Carthage Press