So keen is our clamoring for the terrifying roar of say, a rapacious Tyrannosaurus Rex, a show that features moving replicas of dinosaurs, “Walking With Dinosaurs — The Live Experience,” has been hailed across the country. After six years and $20 million, the tour hit the road two years ago in North America. It is coming Wednesday through Sunday to Harbor Yard in Bridgeport.


 

Our fascination with dinosaurs is far from extinct. So keen is our clamoring for the terrifying roar of say, a rapacious Tyrannosaurus Rex, a show that features moving replicas of dinosaurs, “Walking With Dinosaurs — The Live Experience,” has been hailed across the country. After six years and $20 million, the tour hit the road two years ago in North America. It is coming Wednesday through Sunday to Harbor Yard in Bridgeport.

This 90-minute show features 15 dinosaurs through their 165-million-year reign, and the action is narrated by a paleonotologist who is a bit of an Indiana Jones character.

“We all have a part in our psyche that is intrigued by monsters,” said Cameron Wenn, resident director of “Walking With Dinosaurs,” which is based on the award-winning BBC television series of the same name. “But we know these monsters are real, we have found fossils and bones and we know they existed on the planet we inhabit now, so that piques people’s interest more than a science fiction monster or make believe monster.”

The dinosaurs are animatronic, computer-driven puppetry, and audience-goers, Wenn said, have been “pretty much awestruck” with how realistic they are.

They also are surprised at how much they learn, Wenn said. For example, most people are surprised dinosaurs existed for 170 million years.

“That speaks to how successful they were as a species,” he said.

The struggles to adapt to the changing environments on earth is a dramatic piece of the dinosaur story, all narrated by the paleontologist.

“The paleontologist walks us through the periods of dinosaurs and explains what makes the dinosaurs unique and how they evolve, and he builds all the science in a very palatable way,” Wenn said.

And ultimately, he observed, dinosaurs aren’t as far away from humans as it looks after seeing the show.

“These animals need for survival, their urge to protect their young, that basically links them to us,” Wenn said. “They are basically confronted by the same things as we are.”

Norwich Bulletin