Take a drive into the country and you’ll see the fields are almost bare already. A couple of local businesses with many years of harvest experience agree the fall has been a good one for harvest conditions.

Take a drive into the country and you’ll see the fields are almost bare already. A couple of local businesses with many years of harvest experience agree the fall has been a good one for harvest conditions.

“It’s been a good harvest,” said Carly Johnson, Grain Department Manager at River Region Cooperative. “The weather’s been ideal with no rain delay. The quality is good and the corn is dried down, saving the farmer some drying costs.”

Dave Rosenhamer, VP of Supply Chain and Environmental Compliance at Christensen Farms, agreed about the weather. “Very good growing weather this summer has transitioned into a great harvesting season,” he said. “Dry and warm October days have aided in field drying and harvest pace.” Rosenhamer also commented that yields have been reported above average and corn quality is very good.

“Harvest conditions for the 2015 crop have been excellent,” said Wayne Schoper, Farm Business Management Instructor at South Central College. “In fact, as good as it gets with the soybean harvest starting during the last week of September and wrapping up by mid-October. Soybean yields were generally really excellent with many farmers saying these are historically the best overall yields they have seen.”

Schoper said reports from farms in the area indicate a range of soybean yields from 50 to 65 bushels, with an overall average in the high 50s to low 60s. He said corn yields have also been excellent, reported in a range of 165 to 200 bushels per acre. “Anecdotal reports from area farms show some fields exceeding 225 bushels per acre,” said Schoper.

Schoper said tillage is proceeding at a good pace. He expects a lot of field work will be done by the end of October into the first week of November.

Of course, farming is a business and good harvest conditions and high yields aren’t the only factors. Schoper also addressed the corn and soybean markets.

“Market prices for corn and soybeans are lower, which is common for where we are in the harvest season. New crop corn is below the cost of production with current cash price at $3.25 per bushel,” said Schoper. “Most input costs are at all-time highs for the 2015 crop and come in around $4.25 to $4.50 per bushel.”

Sounding more hopeful on beans, Schoper said, “Cash soybeans are around $8.25 per bushel and with higher yields we can make some money with soybeans.”