No, I'm not referring to the overabundance of cosmetics in the world, although there is a plethora of products out there.  I'm talking about the 21st century proclivity to make up words.  Yes, I realize words and phrases have been coined since the beginnings of language, but this has gone a bit awry in the past couple of decades.

Case in point, such terms as Google, which is now an actual verb and not just a product name.  I can't remember anyone saying, "Just AOL it" back at the end of the 20th century.  It seems that now all you have to do is add "ed" to the end of something and it becomes a new expression.

This week I was shopping and while browsing in the health and beauty department I was looking at the store's own product line when I noticed their equivalent of X-Lax, which was called "chocolated laxative." I showed it to my daughter, who just shook her head and laughed.  And yes, spell check and autocorrect didn't even want to accept the world "chocolated" as I wrote this.

The opposite end of this spectrum is our tendency on social media to abbreviate words, thus resulting in a kind of incoherent speech which I fear will only continue in the lives of young people until they reach adulthood and then will no longer be able to construct sentences.

This use of acronyms such as BRB (be right back) or LOL (laugh out loud), not to mention some I can't even repeat here simply follows the suit of our society of instant and quick communication and satisfaction.  I guess since the ancient Hebrews only used consonants our society can as well.

However it makes me wonder when I see such poor uses of common words as there, their and they're or to, too and two.  I'm not sure if it's just a case of mistaken identity or a lack of attention to detail, but it's a sad fact in modern society.

Whether you are like me and remember when text meant words on a page and an instant message meant speaking in a conversation or you are more than comfortable with condensed, abridged and generally made up terms of communication, I believe the future holds much less face to face communication and much more impersonal, digital forms of speech.

I hope the teachers of the world are prepared to help stem the tide of this trend.  I love technology as much as the next person, but used as an aid to education and knowledge and not as a way of replacing our traditional way of human interaction.  Otherwise we'll all be stuck in cubicles sending out emails and text messages to persons in the next cubicle until no one has to speak to anyone about anything anymore!

No, I'm not referring to the overabundance of cosmetics in the world, although there is a plethora of products out there.  I'm talking about the 21st century proclivity to make up words.  Yes, I realize words and phrases have been coined since the beginnings of language, but this has gone a bit awry in the past couple of decades. Case in point, such terms as Google, which is now an actual verb and not just a product name.  I can't remember anyone saying, "Just AOL it" back at the end of the 20th century.  It seems that now all you have to do is add "ed" to the end of something and it becomes a new expression. This week I was shopping and while browsing in the health and beauty department I was looking at the store's own product line when I noticed their equivalent of X-Lax, which was called "chocolated laxative." I showed it to my daughter, who just shook her head and laughed.  And yes, spell check and autocorrect didn't even want to accept the world "chocolated" as I wrote this. The opposite end of this spectrum is our tendency on social media to abbreviate words, thus resulting in a kind of incoherent speech which I fear will only continue in the lives of young people until they reach adulthood and then will no longer be able to construct sentences. This use of acronyms such as BRB (be right back) or LOL (laugh out loud), not to mention some I can't even repeat here simply follows the suit of our society of instant and quick communication and satisfaction.  I guess since the ancient Hebrews only used consonants our society can as well. However it makes me wonder when I see such poor uses of common words as there, their and they're or to, too and two.  I'm not sure if it's just a case of mistaken identity or a lack of attention to detail, but it's a sad fact in modern society. Whether you are like me and remember when text meant words on a page and an instant message meant speaking in a conversation or you are more than comfortable with condensed, abridged and generally made up terms of communication, I believe the future holds much less face to face communication and much more impersonal, digital forms of speech. I hope the teachers of the world are prepared to help stem the tide of this trend.  I love technology as much as the next person, but used as an aid to education and knowledge and not as a way of replacing our traditional way of human interaction.  Otherwise we'll all be stuck in cubicles sending out emails and text messages to persons in the next cubicle until no one has to speak to anyone about anything anymore!