Purse makers may groan, but there is less of a reason to carry a wallet due to all of the different pay apps available today.

Purse makers may groan, but there is less of a reason to carry a wallet due to all of the different pay apps available today.

Notice the Android Pay app pre-loaded on your new smartphone? What is that all about?
After a credit or debit card is connected to Android Pay, consumers need only indicate in the app that Android Pay can be used at any contactless payment terminal. When out shopping and need to purchase an item, simply unlock the phone and place it near a merchant’s contactless terminal. Voila! Purchase made. Plus, any loyalty program points and special offers are automatically applied.

Other e-pay options:
— In October, Google announced a “pay with Google” option that allows users to make payments with any card connected to a YouTube, Chrome, Android Pay or other Google product account.

— Apple Pay is essentially the same as Android Pay except that it is for iPhones, iPads and the iWatch. And Samsung Pay works on Samsung products, primarily the Galaxy phones.  
— PayPal can actually keep money in its wallet, so the smartphone app works a little differently. According to PayPal, after the app is downloaded to the phone, the user can text PayPal and indicate the amount of money needed and the recipient of the money’s phone number or email address. Or, users can go to the app and indicate recipient of money and amount and simply click Send Now.

— Other common e-payment apps include Venmo and LevelUp. And several banks and credit cards offer e-payment options in their apps — you’ve probably seen the commercials for Chase Pay, Masterpass or Visa Checkout where friends split the tab at dinner on their phones or Serena Williams and Steph Curry pay for broken items after an intense ping-pong match.

Safety tips for these payment options are similar to those for your cards or other accounts: only use a trusted platform or app, create strong passwords and monitor your accounts for signs of suspicious activity. Also, lock your phone or device after use, and turn off your public Wi-Fi connection when using a pay app, suggests personal finance site The Balance.