We are nearing the end of the year. The time of year we all look at ourselves and take a quick glance at our progress. Are we better off financially than we were last year? Are our relationships and friendships just as strong? Are we living with more love and less stress or the opposite?

We are nearing the end of the year. The time of year we all look at ourselves and take a quick glance at our progress. Are we better off financially than we were last year? Are our relationships and friendships just as strong? Are we living with more love and less stress or the opposite?

Lots of these factors can go into coaching as well. I can’t imagine the normal job is as rewarding as what we coaches do. We get to operate with people who are open about their desire for more hope and a clear plan for heading towards success. Us coaches provide that hope. Reasons I love being a coach. Where do I start? Being a visionary is one of them.

A foundation of benefit for coaching is playing a part to help young people realize their potential and grow. There is nothing better than being that person to add value to others’ lives and watching them progress and grow to get more out of their lives for themselves.

Learning from people I coach with and against and gaining their perspective and strategies they have in the game and life is also a special trait that I enjoy in coaching. I have especially been blessed with the chance to work with the coaches I do. Aaron Nesvold, Cory Haala, John Hirschboeck, Bruce Woitas, Dusty Mangen, and Shane Heiderschiedt have all been great head coaches that I have worked under and I have gained so much knowledge from them. I am very fortunate to have been under their wings.

Another reason why coaching is so great is connecting with young individuals; making a difference and watching them achieve the outcome they have desired. Finding joy in a student’s success, of course, but creating and being involved in a successful coach-player relationship is pretty fun. There are not many feelings better than helping a player develop confidence and having them use that confidence to help them soar in all aspects of life.

I could go on and on, but I will make it short this week. The great Lou Holtz was once asked, “Why do you coach?” His answer may just be my answer as well. “Coaching gives one a chance to be successful as well as significant. The difference between those two is that when you die, your success comes to an end. When you are significant, you continue to help others be successful long after you are gone. Significance lasts many lifetimes. That is why people teach, why people lead, and why people coach.”