|
|
The Sleepy Eye Herald Dispatch - Sleepy Eye, MN
  • More mansions of Sleepy Eye

  • Continuing from my last month’s story on Sleepy Eye’s mansions, we still have so many houses to discover and learn about. Knowing that our town is still growing in the 1870s, or to be exact, 1872, many of our homes are very elaborate for their times.
    • email print
  • Continuing from my last month’s story on Sleepy Eye’s mansions, we still have so many houses to discover and learn about. Knowing that our town is still growing in the 1870s, or to be exact, 1872, many of our homes are very elaborate for their times. Many of these homes had, and still have today, many of the features they did centuries ago.
     
    Some of these homes were the homes of A.F. and Mary Strickler, located at 300 1st Avenue S. Both Abraham Franklin and Mary Strickler were doctors beginning their practices in Sleepy Eye at the turn of the century. A.F. graduated from the University of Michigan Medical School in Ann Arbor, Mich. and Mary graduated from the University of Minnesota Medical School. This house was built in 1905, was unique in the area for its Italianate design.
     
    Our next mansion in Sleepy Eye to look at is known as the George Sommerville House. This house is located at 518 2nd Avenue SW. George Sommerville was an attorney in Sleepy Eye for many years. He was County Attorney from 1882-1886, and served as State Senator from the Brown-Redwood Counties District from 1899 to 1905. This house was built in 1906, and had a variety of functions. After being a residence for the senator, it was a maternity hospital in the 1940s, and then a funeral home from 1950 to 1971. Somerville had a son and two daughters. They occupied the house about three years until he nearly died of an assassin’s bullet. After his recovery, Sommerville traveled a lot and spent most of his time in California. Years before this house was built the land had held a small home occupied by the F.H. Dyckman family. Dyckman was Sleepy Eye’s first banker. He later returned to his native New Jersey. The old house, a square white structure with a little “widow’s walk” on the roof, was moved to West Water Street. It stood west of the corner house at the southwest corner of Water and Third Ave SW. Old pictures show Mrs. Dyckman in front of big snow drifts with the house almost hidden. The Sommerville house was used as a maternity ward for a time, mainly for the birth of babies. When William Schwartz bought it he remodeled it as a funeral home and resided in the Glatigny house. Later it became the Larry Clow Funeral Home and then later residents were occupants of the Somerville house.
     
    Our last mansion for this month to mention is the L. Andrew Glatigny House. This house is located at 503 2nd Avenue SW. This house was built in 1899. L. Andrew Glatigny was a florist in Sleepy Eye at the turn of the century. Glass greenhouses were added to the house in 1900 and 1901. A circular sidewalk leading to the house always had colorful flowers planted in it. A small porch on the north side gave entrance to the dining room. The main entrance was on the southeast. The little north porch had been changed a bit, but on the south side of the house the kitchen was extended by William Schwartz when he lived there. He also built a large extension on the second floor south which is out of harmony with the rest of the house. The circular tower still exists. The barn, which was styled after the house, has been moved to the lot west and remodeled.
      • calendar