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The Sleepy Eye Herald Dispatch - Sleepy Eye, MN
  • It's getting hot in here

  • For nearly 90 days I’ve become an insomniac. I blame our new memory foam mattress.
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  • For nearly 90 days I’ve become an insomniac. I blame our new memory foam mattress.
     
    Hubby has always had a bad back and with age, it’s getting worse. When he began doctoring for symptoms related to fibromyalgia, we went in search for some added relief.
     
    After signing over our life and our first born son to purchase a new memory foam mattress we were excited at the prospect of a good night’s sleep for the first time since either of us could remember when.
     
    It was a short-lived dream.
     
    The first night with our new mattress we noticed the problems. Basically, we found that sinking into a memory foam mattress caused us both to feel too hot to sleep (and I don’t mean that it a good way!)
     
    As the night progresses the mattress grows hotter and hotter directly under you, eventually waking us up, a few times a night, dripping with sweat.
     
    Recently we purchased a costly set of 100 percent cotton sheets as prescribed by several customers who reportedly have had the same issues with a memory foam bed. The sheets help a little, but we are still waking up several times a night suffering with what can only be described as heat exhaustion.
     
    We’ve resorted to sleeping without blankets, which leaves us cold on top and hot and sweaty underneath. Not conducive to a good night’s sleep.
     
    A Google search suggested a wool mattress pad (for only half the cost of the mattress.) It said wool has a way of accommodating fluctuating body temperature and the absorbent, hollow fibers wick moisture, keeping the air next to your skin dry and eliminating that damp, clammy feeling. It also said wool’s cushioned support conforms to the contours of your body to ease pressure points and aid in circulation.
     
    That’s exactly what the mattress advertised too.
     
    Further investigation online revealed that the lack of airflow in a memory foam bed is due to the foam’s tight, closed cell structure resulting in a tendency to retain heat.
     
    All those complaints about “sleeping hot” have spawned the next wave in memory foam mattress marketing: gel-infused memory foam. The new gel foam claims to sleep cooler than regular memory foam.
     
    Except that’s not true either.
     
    Page 2 of 2 - Our mattress is branded as “Cool Action Gel Memory Foam,” described as having millions of “MicroSupport” gel beads designed to make the foam’s surface feel cooler. But all the gel-buzz makes it easy to lose sight of the real problem: memory foam—gel infused or not—sleeps hot because it lacks breathability.
     
    Which has led Hubby and me to a new problem.
     
    I drag myself out of bed cranky and in a bad mood even before I start the day. Most mornings, since getting the mattress, Hubby and I have began our day with an argument because both of us are tired. Some of the arguments have become so intense I’ve been known to throw Hubby out of the house to begin his day only half dressed.
     
    One day I came back into the bedroom after starting the shower to grab my robe I had forgotten during an early morning exchange that sent him running for the door earlier than usual. I startled both of us when I opened the door causing him to nearly fall on the floor with one leg in his pants.
     
    “Don’t hurt me!” He yelled with his hands up. “I just came back to get my pants.”
     
    I’ve laid out the details and I’m happy the bed comes with a money-back guarantee. I don’t like being a quitter, but this mattress isn’t working. As for minimizing the motion, what use is a jiggle-proof mattress when I’m sleeping under the same covers that can be yanked this way and that and completely off my back?
     
    The moral of the story–there is more to nighttime comfort than a mattress–and I think other memory foam sufferers will agree.

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