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The Sleepy Eye Herald Dispatch - Sleepy Eye, MN
  • Mike Suess wins awards at invention show in Redwood Falls

  • Mike and Kristy Suess of Sleepy Eye took two inventions to the Redwood Falls Invention & Idea show held April 19-20.
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  • Mike and Kristy Suess of Sleepy Eye took two inventions to the Redwood Falls Invention & Idea show held April 19-20.
     
    The two exhibits, the Powerizer and the Tailmate, won Mike several awards.
     
    “It was recognition for his inventions,” Kristy said. “Although more people visited our booth because of the awards.” 
     
    He received a bronze medallion for the Tailmate and the Powerizer got the Minnesota AgrAbility Project Award first prize. Mike also received the Youngest Inventor award.
     
    The Powerizer is the newest invention, Kristy said, which still has a patent pending.
     
    The rechargeable resource center is a small toolbox with a 12-volt battery inside and features an exterior USB outlet and three 12-volt adapter connections for powering or charging most electronic devices. The unit also features six LED lights and is ideal for tent camping, ice fishing or power outages to keep devices charged.
     
    The Tailmate is a trailer light and electric brake testing unit that works without a power source using universal, seven-way outlets and toggle switches.
    “It enables people to pull a trailer without a vehicle and it also allows for one person to be able to test trailer lights,” Kristy added.
     
    The Tailmate is on the market and Mike has sold 30 in only a short time. Tailmates can be purchased by going to their website: 12volttogo.com.
     
    Kristy said this is the first show the couple has showcased the inventions at, but Mike has been inventing since he was 15 years old. In fact, Tailmate was his first invention.
     
    However, Mike isn’t willing to quit his day job as a lineman for Brown County REA to go into inventing full-time.
     
    Kristy mentioned that their son, Brayden, age 8, also has a talent for inventing things.
     
    “At the show they had a little kids invention corner and he was right over there,” Kristy said. “I will definitely look for my son’s name in the future. He’s been building and inventing things since he could hold a hammer.” 
     
    Since 1958, the Minnesota Inventors Congress (MIC) has hosted an invention show in Redwood Falls. The event offers inventors the opportunity to talk to patent attorneys and consultants who are experts in the product development process.
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