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The Sleepy Eye Herald Dispatch - Sleepy Eye, MN
  • You asked...About Bullying

  • Bullying is unwanted, aggressive behavior among school aged children that involves a real or perceived power imbalance.
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  • Bullying is unwanted, aggressive behavior among school aged children that involves a real or perceived power imbalance.
     
     
    The behavior is repeated, or has the potential to be repeated, over time. Both kids who are bullied and who bully others may have serious, lasting problems. 
     
    In order to be considered bullying, the behavior must be aggressive and include:
     
     
    •An Imbalance of Power
    •Repetition
     
     
    Bullying includes actions such as making threats, spreading rumors, attacking someone physically or verbally, and excluding someone from a group on purpose.
     
     
    The term bullying is typically used to refer to behavior that occurs between school-aged kids. However, adults can be repeatedly aggressive and use power over each other, too. Adults in the workplace have a number of different laws that apply to them that do not apply to kids.
     
     
    Cyberbullying is bullying that takes place using electronic technology. Electronic technology includes devices and equipment such as cell phones, computers and tablets, as well as communication tools including social media sites, text messages, chat and websites.
     
    Examples of cyberbullying include mean text messages or e-mails, rumors sent by e-mail or posted on social networking sites, and embarrassing pictures, videos, websites, or fake profiles.
     
     
    Every day, communities and schools throughout our country take on the critical work of creating safe, healthy places where children can learn, play and grow. Community and school leaders face considerable challenges in this work: poverty and violence; mental health and substance abuse issues; growing truancy, expulsion, suspension and dropout rates; disproportionate rates of achievement among children and youth of color; and shrinking resources.
     
    Bullying can be prevented, especially when the power of a community is brought together. Community-wide strategies can help identify and support children who are bullied, redirect the behavior of children who bully, and change the attitudes of adults and youth who tolerate bullying behaviors in peer groups, schools and communities. 
     
     
    Bullying doesn’t happen only at school. Community members can use their unique strengths and skills to prevent bullying wherever it occurs. For example, youth sports groups may train coaches to prevent bullying. Local businesses may make t-shirts with bullying prevention slogans for an event. After-care staff may read books about bullying to kids and discuss them. Hearing anti-bullying messages from the different adults in their lives can reinforce the message for kids that bullying is unacceptable.
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